Can the truth be told with facts that lie?
From my first glance at this picture I shot in 1980 in Montreal of Roberto Duran throwing a powerful right hook at a cowered Sugar Ray Leonard, I knew that it had captured the bout’s essence. The legendary “Brawl in Montreal” is recognized as the first Superfight of the 80s. Through 15 rounds, Duran pursued and bullied the defending champion and captured the title by unanimous decision.
But, even though the picture depicts the action truly, the powerful punch — which accounts greatly for the photo’s emphatic composition — actually missed Leonard entirely. You can use facts that mislead to tell the truth.

Can the truth be told with facts that lie?

From my first glance at this picture I shot in 1980 in Montreal of Roberto Duran throwing a powerful right hook at a cowered Sugar Ray Leonard, I knew that it had captured the bout’s essence. The legendary “Brawl in Montreal” is recognized as the first Superfight of the 80s. Through 15 rounds, Duran pursued and bullied the defending champion and captured the title by unanimous decision.

But, even though the picture depicts the action truly, the powerful punch — which accounts greatly for the photo’s emphatic composition — actually missed Leonard entirely. You can use facts that mislead to tell the truth.